Planet Earth Weekly

Climate Change and Renewable Energy: Saving Our Planet for Future Generations


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Climate Change: Your Obligation to Future Generations

Fiddle While Earth Burns

Rome, i.e. Earth Burns

“Legend has it that while a fire destroyed Rome, Nero, the emperor, played his violin unconcerned about the city or its people”

By Linn Smith

Today, to fiddle while Rome burns has come to mean, “To do something trivial and irresponsible in the midst of an emergency.” Stephen M. Gardner said it best, “The time to think seriously about the future of humanity is upon us.” (From “A perfect Moral Storm: The Ethical Tragedy of Climate Change”) Gardner states that most people don’t care enough about climate change and its consequences, as we have not succeeded in placing restrictions to deter catastrophe in the next few years. In the meantime, the earth continues to warm due to the greenhouse effect, putting CO2 and other greenhouse gases into our atmosphere.

Survival in the Future

The problems of future generations will be a result of our careless choices today. These problems will result from today’s population pouring more and more greenhouse gases into our atmosphere. Gardner provokes us to ask ourselves the questions: Can the next generation survive? How about the next? And the next? If you knew for sure that your children and grandchildren could not survive due to your actions today, would you live differently? Or just live for today?

The Earth’s temperature continues to increase

Gas Vehicles vs. Clean Energy Vehicles

The latest news….a drop in gas prices. A drop in the price of gas means drivers save money at the gas pump and the sales of larger vehicles increase. Some see this decrease in gas prices as the ability to put more miles on their car. I’m here to remind you that you have an obligation for the survival of our planet! However low gas prices drop you still have a sacrifice to make, to future generations, to drive less or drive a clean energy vehicle, or take public transportation, bikes or some other means of cutting your carbon footprint. Today you can buy an EV conversion kit for most vehicles. Even though they are pricey, starting at around $7500 for the kit if you do it yourself, they are less expensive than a new electric vehicle depending on the type of vehicle you plan to convert.

Records a breaking

Records break as temperature increases.

Global Warming: Breaking Records

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the July 2019 global land and ocean surface temperature average was the highest for July since global records began in 1880 at .95 C (1.71 degrees F) above the 20th century average. This temperature passed the previous record set in 2016. Nine of the ten warmest Julys have been recorded since 2005. This past July 2019 was the hottest month recorded on earth since recording started. Along with heat comes drought and severe weather. The global average temperature for July 2019 was 62.1 degrees F. That is 0.05 degrees F higher than July 2016 which broke the previous record.

Climate change

Temperatures continue to increase.

Prediction of Future Heat Waves

National Geographic “Off the Charts Heat” by Stephen Leahy, states that, “Within 60 years hot days in the U.S. could be so intense that the current heat index can’t measure them.” Temperatures could be off the charts with 127 degrees or more, posing unpresidented health risks. His prediction is that “Between 2036 and 2065 more than 250 U.S. cities will experience the equivalent of a month or more per year on average with the heat index surpassing 100 degrees F, which is a conservative estimate because of urban heat islands.” My colleague and writing partner, Dr. John J. Hidore, thinks these predictions are very conservative.

Global warming

Less deniers?

The S.E. and Southern Great Plains will be hit the worst by global warming in the United States. Areas here could experience the equivalent of 3 months per year on average by mid century that would feel hotter than 105 degrees or more. Exposure to this heat could be tragic. It will change life as we know it!

Global Warming: Is there still time?

Stephen Leahy also gives hope by saying we still have time. If future warming is kept at 3.6 degrees F or less, the number of days above 105 degrees nationwide would be slashed in half. But the U.S. will still be significantly warmer. Even if current pledges to cut emissions under the Paris Agreement are met, global temperatures will still rise by at least 5.4 degrees F (3 degrees C) by 2100. Along with the heat comes droughts, wildfires, floods and other extreme weather. As population grows, food production will also be affected.

Do the next right thing!

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Global Warming


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Greenland: Human Settlement has been Dictated by a Changing Climate

Melting of the Arctic

The Arctic sea ice is melting at a record rate.

“The year 2016 was the warmest year globally since records began in 1880!

By Dr. John J Hidore

January 25, 2017—–Since Greenland was first settled by arctic people and Europeans, climate has played a huge part in the ups and downs of the human population. The first European colonization took place during a relatively warm period in the Arctic. The global climate during the years 950 AD to 1250 AD is known as the Little Climatic Optimum. Weather was unusually warm for several centuries and human settlements spread toward the Arctic. Iceland and Greenland were settled as were other islands in the North Atlantic Ocean.

Eric the Red is believed to have discovered Greenland in 982 AD. In 984 AD, the Norse founded the colony of Osterbygd on the island. Evidence of agriculture and other activities serve to indicate what the climate was like at this time. While it was a cold land, it supported enough vegetation (dwarf willow, birch, bush berries, pasture land) to make settlement possible. The settlers brought cattle and sheep that not only survived but thrived for a considerable period. The Norse established two colonies and began to farm. The outposts thrived and regular communications existed between Greenland and Iceland.

The Little Ice Age and the End of Norse Settlements

Between 1250 AD and 1450 AD climate deteriorated over wide areas around the North Atlantic in what is known as The Little Ice Age. The Little Ice Age was the coldest period in historic times. Areas bordering the North Atlantic Ocean experienced drastic cooling. Mountain glaciers expanded and in some cases reached their maximum extent since the end of the Pleistocene glaciation. Iceland’s population declined. Greenland became isolated from outside contact, with extensive drift ice preventing boats reaching the settlements. Grain that grew there in the tenth century would no longer grow. In Europe storms resulted in the formation of the Zuider Zee, and the excessively wet, damp conditions led to a high incidence of the disease, St. Anthony’s Fire (ergotism).

The little ice age marked the end of the Norse settlements in Greenland that had begun in the tenth century. After flourishing for more than 400 years the colonies disappeared about 1410 AD. A Danish archaeological expedition to the sites in 1921 found evidence that deteriorating climate must have played a role in the population’s demise. Excavations show that at first the soil permitted burying bodies at considerable depth. Later graves became progressively shallower. Some graves were in permafrost that had formed since the burial. Tree roots entangled in the coffins showed the graves were not originally in frozen ground. It also showed that the permafrost had moved progressively higher. Examination of skeletons indicated that food was becoming more and more scarce. Most remains were deformed or dwarfed. There was clear evidence of rickets. All the evidence points to a climate that grew progressively cooler, leading eventually to the isolation and extinction of the settlements. It is not certain the colonies failed due to climatic reasons, but it seems likely.

By 1516 the settlements had practically been forgotten. In 1540 a voyager reported seeing signs of the settlements, but no signs of life. The settlers had perished.

Resettlement of Greenland

There was no European settlement on the island of Greenland for 200 years. In 1721 Denmark sent an expedition to the island to form an outpost, starting the Greenland resettlement.

Glacier National Park

Global warming is causing disappearing glaciers.

The Warming of Greenland

In recent centuries the climate of the Arctic basin has warmed a great deal. The average temperature over land in the Arctic for the year ending in September 2015 reached the highest since recording began in 1900. The temperature was 2.3 degrees F above the mean for the last 114 years .

The year 2016 was the warmest year globally since records began in 1880. The average temperature for 2016 was 58.69 ºF. Temperatures on Greenland followed suit. In June at Nuuk, the capitol city, the temperature reached 75º F (24º C). As temperatures continued to warm the population of the island has been growing. The current population is now above 55,000. Many small settlements have sprung up and agriculture is returning. Until recent years fishing was the primary industry, but now tourism is a growing source of income. Unemployment is relatively high, but with increasing temperatures and more varied employment sources the population is expected to continue to grow. Human settlement in Greenland has been dictated by a changing climate!

Climate change effects Greenland!